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Issue 119 - All Change May Not be Progress, But All Progress is the Result of Change

Woodens Wisdom
Wooden's Wisdom - Volume 3 Issue 119
Craig Impelman Speaking |  Championship Coaches |  Champion's Leadership Library Login

 

ALL CHANGE MAY NOT BE PROGRESS, BUT ALL PROGRESS IS THE RESULT OF CHANGE

 
These timeless words of wisdom from Coach Wooden continue to become more and more important as technology improves our communication, and the opportunities for change continue to increase.
 
The word progress is almost always welcomed. The word change sometimes creates resistance.
 
Robert Kennedy put it this way: Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator. And change has its enemies.
 
Benjamin Franklin clearly described the necessity for change: When you're finished changing, you're finished.
 
Albert Einstein took the idea a step further with his definition of insanity: Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
 
In his book, Wooden: A Lifetime of Observations and Reflections on and Off the Court, with Steve Jamison, Coach Wooden put the idea in proper perspective:
 
You must never stand still. You're either moving upward a little bit or you're going the other way.
 
You can't expect to go upward too quickly, but you can sure go down very quickly. The slide down happens in a hurry. Progress comes slowly but steadily if you are patient and prepare diligently.
 
Youth is a time of impatience. Young people can't understand why the problems of society can't be solved right now.
 
They haven't lived long enough to fully understand human nature, and lack the patience that eventually brings an understanding of the relatively slow nature of change.
 
On the other hand, older people often become set in their ways, fear change, and accept problems that should be addressed and resolved.
 
The young must remember that all good and worthwhile things take time (and that is exactly as it should be).
 
Their elders must remember that although not all change is progress, all progress is the result of change (and to resist or fear change is often to get in the way of progress).
 
The practice of reminding any group that All change may not be progress, but all progress is the result of change when introducing a new program has a positive effect.
 
The idea communicates clearly that while there is no guarantee this new program will work, there is a possibility of improvement.
 
On the other hand, if we don't try something new there is no possibility of improvement.
 
This understanding creates an environment where people rally and take the approach: Let's give it our best shot and see if we can make something positive happen.
 
As Franklin D. Roosevelt said: There are many ways of going forward, but only one way of standing still.
 
 

Yours in Coaching,
 
 
Craig Impelman
 
 
Twitter: @woodenswisdom


 

 

 

Watch Video

Application Exercise

COACH'S
Favorite Poetry
AND PROSE

 

The Builders

 

All are architects of Fate,
Working in these walls of Time;
Some with massive deeds and great,
Some with ornaments of rhyme.

Nothing useless is, or low;
Each thing in its place is best;
And what seems but idle show
Strengthens and supports the rest.

For the structure that we raise,
Time is with materials filled;
Our to-days and yesterdays
Are the blocks with which we build.

Truly shape and fashion these;
Leave no yawning gaps between; Think not, because no man sees,
Such things will remain unseen.

In the elder days of Art,
Builders wrought with greatest care
Each minute and unseen part;
For the Gods see everywhere.

Let us do our work as well,
Both the unseen and the seen;
Make the house, where Gods may dwell,
Beautiful, entire, and clean.

Else our lives are incomplete,
Standing in these walls of Time,
Broken stairways, where the feet
Stumble as they seek to climb.

Build to-day, then, strong and sure,
With a firm and ample base;
And ascending and secure
Shall to-morrow find its place.

Thus alone can we attain
To those turrets, where the eye
Sees the world as one vast plain,
And one boundless reach of sky.


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
(1807-1882)
 

 

 

 

 

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