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Issue 288 - Noble Goals

Woodens Wisdom
Wooden's Wisdom - Volume 6 Issue 288
Craig Impelman Speaking |  Championship Coaches |  Champion's Leadership Library Login

 

NOBLE GOALS

 
 
The following is a short essay Coach Wooden wrote entitled: "WHY DO I COACH?":
 
"Why do I coach?" is a question that almost every coach who has been in the profession for any appreciable length of time will ask himself.
 
Amos Alonzo Stagg, a man of tremendous stature and influence in our profession, made a most wonderful statement in regard to this. This most gracious human being who continued working with youngsters well into his 90s said, "It was because of a promise I made to God."
 
As a young man he planned to become a minister and attended Yale Theological School to prepare for the pulpit. One day after talking with God through prayer and seeking a way to serve best, he decided to trade the pulpit for the athletic field. He said, "I have made the young men of America my ministry. I have tried to bring out the best in the boys I have coached. I truly believe many of them have become better Christians and citizens because of what they have learned on the athletic field. You must love your boys to get the most out of them and to do the most for them. I have worked with boys whom I haven't admired, but I have loved them just the same. Love has dominated my coaching career, as I am sure it has and always will that of many other coaches and teachers."
 
I hope that my love for youngsters is the underlying reason why I have stayed in the coaching profession and refused positions that would've been far more lucrative.
 
When I think of my boys, the following poem, "They Ask Me Why I Teach," by Glennice L. Harmon usually comes to mind:
 
They ask me why I teach
And I reply, "Where could I find more splendid company?"
There sits a statesman,
Strong, unbiased, wise,
Another later Webster
Silver-tongued.
And there a doctor
Whose quick, steady hand
Can mend a bone or stem the lifeblood's flow.
A builder sits beside him --
Upward rise the arches of that church he builds wherein
That minister will speak the word of God,
And lead a stumbling soul to touch the Christ.

And all about
A lesser gathering
Of farmers, merchants, teachers,
Laborers, men
Who work and vote and build
And plan and pray into a great tomorrow.
And, I say,
"I may not see the church,
Or hear the word,
Or eat the food their hands will grow."
And yet -- I may.

And later I may say,
"I knew the lad, and he was strong,
Or weak, or kind, or proud
Or bold or gay.
I knew him once,
But then he was a boy."
They ask me why I teach and I reply,
"Where could I find more splendid company?"
 
If you can connect your daily activities with helping others in some way, your life will have a noble goal and greater meaning.
 
What is your life’s noble goal?
 
 
 

Yours in Coaching,
 
 
Craig Impelman
 
 
 
 


 

 

 

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Application Exercise

COACH'S FAVORITE POETRY AND PROSE

 

THE COMMON JOYS

THESE joys are free to all who live
The rich and poor, the great and low:
The charms which kindness has to give,
The smiles which friendship may bestow,
The honor of a well-spent life,
The glory of a purpose true,
High courage in the stress of strife,
And peace when every task is through.

Nor class nor caste nor race nor creed,
Nor greater might can take away
The splendor of an honest deed.
Who nobly serves from day to day
Shall walk the road of life with pride,
With friends who recognize his worth,
For never are these joys denied
Unto the humblest man on earth.

Not all may rise to world-wide fame,
Not all may gather fortune's gold,
Not all life's luxuries may claim;
In differing ways success is told.
But all may know the peace of mind
Which comes from service brave and true;
The poorest man can still be kind,
And nobly live till life is through.

These joys abound for one and all:
The pride of fearing no man's scorn,
Of standing firm, where others fall,
Of bearing well what must be borne.
He that shall do an honest deed
Shall win an honest deed's rewards;
For these, no matter race or creed,
Life unto every man affords.

Edgar Albert Guest (1881 -1959)

 

 

 

 

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